When Bull Run runs dry, we drink water out of the ground. See what East Portland folks learned from this unique training and trip …

Randy Albright, hydro-geologist and groundwater specialist for the Portland Water Bureau, shows participants exactly where some of their water comes from.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
For some time, the Portland Water Bureau and the Columbia Slough Watershed Council have teamed up to present “Groundwater 101″. This class helps unravel some of the mysteries of the “other” source for Portland’s drinking water.

But on November 4, the team gave an expanded training, called “Groundwater 201″ located at the NECA-IBEW Electrical Training Center.

This workshop started with an in-depth class on our local groundwater sources, using charts, maps and models. The instructors showed the group the importance of keeping the water table clean and usable.

After a light lunch, the participants climbed into a bus for the second half of the event: A tour of the Groundwater Protections Area in outer East Portland.

Portland City Well 14 is the first stop in the groundwater field trip.

Standing on drinking water
Their first stop was at the site of Well 14, out near NE Marine Drive. As participants piled out of the bus, Randy Albright, hydro-geologist and groundwater specialist for the Portland Water Bureau, showed them the lay of the land.

There, Albright told us, “On this field trip, we can show people how things actually look, instead of showing photos, or pointing things out of a map.”

The city has groundwater as its secondary source of drinking water, he added. “It is an important resource for the city. There have been some misconceptions about it in the past. We explain how it functions, and how we’re protecting it for them.

The “how” of protecting groundwater is complicated, as the instructors explain in detail during the class. “The ‘why’ is simple,” Albright said, “We need a good, secondary source of drinking water.”

Not a uniform filter
We learned that the earth and soil, between the top of the ground and the aquifer, varies in thickness.

In Gresham and Troutdale, the layers that can filter groundwater are relatively thick. Yet, in the Parkrose area, this layer is thin, giving little protection to the aquifers below the ground from runoff and contaminated wastewater.

This plant was once a source of groundwater contamination. Now, Boeing is preventing the contaminated groundwater from spreading by pumping it out, and treating it – thus drawing clean water into the area.

Contamination solutions
Looking west, we could see the Boeing Aerospace plant in East County. In the early 1990s, the company was charged with contaminating groundwater.

Albright told the group that Boeing now controls the ‘plume’ of ground contamination around its facility by installing a ring of wells outside the contaminated area. “By pumping out and treating the contaminated water before discharging it into slough, Boeing has created a slightly negative groundwater area so it doesn’t spread into the aquifer tapped by the city’s nearby Well #14.”

Full containment was achieved in 1997, and continues today, he added.

Groundwater protectors
The group then traveled on to Cascade Station, the new development area by Portland International Airport.

Rebecca Geisen, manager of the Groundwater Protection Program, Portland Water Bureau said they’re evaluating whether or not the Cascade Station area development is impacting well fields.

The Cascade Station stop ended with the class touring a stormwater treatment facility. Finally, the class was bussed to the new industrial development area near NE 152nd Ave. and Airport Way.

“The Wellhead Protection Program is important,” Geisen told us, “because it prevents spills of hazardous materials that could contaminate our groundwater. By working with businesses, we’re able to institute best management practices.”

Learn more about your water
Columbia Slough Watershed Council provides a number of programs to help people become more knowledgeable about groundwater, pollution and storm runoff. Visit their website at www.columbiaslough.org to learn more.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

On our tour during the storm, we expected to see massive damage from the 60 mph winds. See what we found, instead ‚Ķ

The high winds pushed over many trees rooted in rain-soaked soil. This tree, on NE 111th Avenue, pulled over a utility pole.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Major storms blowing through our area in early November, days apart, blew tree limbs into yards and roads, flooded low spots in streets, and alarmed a lot of East Portland residents and business people.

While an outer East Portland man was trapped in his truck after a tree in his yard pulled down power lines, and other incidents darkened as many as 2,000 homes for several hours, surprisingly little damage was done by the howling storms.

This MAX stop at 148th Ave. and E. Burnside St. was dark, and traffic was warned to be careful by burning flares.

On Sunday evening, we snaked throughout blacked out intersections on SE Powell, from SE 162nd Ave. westward past SE 136th Ave.

Making our way through Eastmoreland, we expected to see some of the mighty American Elms toppling. All we found was a large branch that fell off a conifer on SE Woodstock, just east of SE 28th Avenue.

Predictions for a wild winter
The weather service predicts more storms in the Pacific that will find their way inland to Portland over the coming months.

Make sure you have plenty of blankets, flashlights – and an auxiliary power source for your computer so you can keep reading East PDX News – when the power goes out!

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Follow along, and see how specialized training keeps Southeast Portland firefighters on their toes, to better save lives …

We used a flash to photograph members of Southeast Portland Fire & Rescue Station 25’s Truck company, in full turnouts and wearing breathing apparatus, crawl through a pitch-dark abandoned factory, in search of a “disabled firefighter”.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Over a dusty, rutted road, Truck 25 – a long, Portland Fire & Rescue ladder rig, based in Southeast Portland, steered around corners by both front and rear drivers – picks its way toward an abandoned factory in Troutdale.

These seasoned firefighters are on their way to a class and training session.

“Today, we’re covering a change in procedure,” Lt. Don Stauffer, Portland Fire and Rescue’s District Training Lieutenant, tells us. Firefighters from three stations gather in the open-air loading dock. Chairs are set up, classroom style, and a white-board is nailed to the building’s chicken-wire and tar-paper wall.

Before the training exercise, Lt. Don Stauffer covers procedure changes and outlines the scenario.

Back to school
Sitting in on the class, we learn the topic is “Air Management” ‚Äì making sure firefighters keep enough air in their breathing tanks to get out of a burning building alive. Stauffer emphasizes the importance of the subject, quoting statistics from the National Fire Protection Association: “More firefighters die from running out of air than die from fire.”

“We’re increasing the amount of reserve air. We now want firefighters to hold 25%, not 10%, of their air in reserve,” he instructs. The crews will conduct their drill under simulated emergency conditions, putting into practice this new procedure. While increasing their safety, the new policy gives firefighters less time to work while having to breathe bottled air.

“In our scenario today,” Stauffer explains, “we have two firefighters down [injured, and running out of bottled air]. To simulate the structure being filled with smoke, we’ll be doing this drill completely in the dark ‚Äì no flashlights. Locate them, get an extra air supply on them, and bring them out to the exit point.”

To help prevent injury, firefighters warm up before suiting up for the drill.

After the formal learning session, firefighters “warm up” by doing stretching exercises, much like athletes before training.

As the firefighters don their turnouts, tanks, and masks, we ask Stauffer why the Fire Bureau didn’t simply send out a memo explaining the new procedure.

Drilling for proficiency
“Even though we do this every day, drilling gets you more proficient,” Stauffer responds. “This means you’ll be able to react more quickly, and make better decisions ‚Äì especially in life-or-death situations. They’re highly skilled already. But simulations help them sharpen their decision-making abilities. To rescue people and save property, firefighters must first themselves stay alive.”

Station 25 firefighters Mike Schultz, Mark Gift, Zach Parrish and Jeremy Paul don their gear and check each other’s equipment before entering the building.

The training team has blacked out the building’s interior. We enter the first floor of the building — originally a wool processing plant — getting ready to photograph the entrance of the crew from Truck 25. After our eyes adjust to the darkness, the only light visible is the dial of the instructor’s wristwatch.

The firefighters enter and begin their drill in complete darkness. A hose line, stretched on the floor, is their only guide as they crawl around obstacles. They follow the hose up a staircase. Within minutes, they come to the aid of their fallen comrade; they successfully complete the drill.

Then, as it happens, within hours of training, the crew of Station 25 was off on a real call, putting to use their newly-honed skills, saving lives and property.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Follow along, and see how specialized training keeps Southeast Portland firefighters on their toes, to better save lives …

We used a flash to photograph members of Southeast Portland Fire & Rescue Station 25’s Truck company, in full turnouts and wearing breathing apparatus, crawl through a pitch-dark abandoned factory, in search of a “disabled firefighter”.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Over a dusty, rutted road, Truck 25 – a long, Portland Fire & Rescue ladder rig, based in Southeast Portland, steered around corners by both front and rear drivers – picks its way toward an abandoned factory in Troutdale.

These seasoned firefighters are on their way to a class and training session.

“Today, we’re covering a change in procedure,” Lt. Don Stauffer, Portland Fire and Rescue’s District Training Lieutenant, tells us. Firefighters from three stations gather in the open-air loading dock. Chairs are set up, classroom style, and a white-board is nailed to the building’s chicken-wire and tar-paper wall.

Before the training exercise, Lt. Don Stauffer covers procedure changes and outlines the scenario.

Back to school
Sitting in on the class, we learn the topic is “Air Management” ‚Äì making sure firefighters keep enough air in their breathing tanks to get out of a burning building alive. Stauffer emphasizes the importance of the subject, quoting statistics from the National Fire Protection Association: “More firefighters die from running out of air than die from fire.”

“We’re increasing the amount of reserve air. We now want firefighters to hold 25%, not 10%, of their air in reserve,” he instructs. The crews will conduct their drill under simulated emergency conditions, putting into practice this new procedure. While increasing their safety, the new policy gives firefighters less time to work while having to breathe bottled air.

“In our scenario today,” Stauffer explains, “we have two firefighters down [injured, and running out of bottled air]. To simulate the structure being filled with smoke, we’ll be doing this drill completely in the dark ‚Äì no flashlights. Locate them, get an extra air supply on them, and bring them out to the exit point.”

To help prevent injury, firefighters warm up before suiting up for the drill.

After the formal learning session, firefighters “warm up” by doing stretching exercises, much like athletes before training.

As the firefighters don their turnouts, tanks, and masks, we ask Stauffer why the Fire Bureau didn’t simply send out a memo explaining the new procedure.

Drilling for proficiency
“Even though we do this every day, drilling gets you more proficient,” Stauffer responds. “This means you’ll be able to react more quickly, and make better decisions ‚Äì especially in life-or-death situations. They’re highly skilled already. But simulations help them sharpen their decision-making abilities. To rescue people and save property, firefighters must first themselves stay alive.”

Station 25 firefighters Mike Schultz, Mark Gift, Zach Parrish and Jeremy Paul don their gear and check each other’s equipment before entering the building.

The training team has blacked out the building’s interior. We enter the first floor of the building — originally a wool processing plant — getting ready to photograph the entrance of the crew from Truck 25. After our eyes adjust to the darkness, the only light visible is the dial of the instructor’s wristwatch.

The firefighters enter and begin their drill in complete darkness. A hose line, stretched on the floor, is their only guide as they crawl around obstacles. They follow the hose up a staircase. Within minutes, they come to the aid of their fallen comrade; they successfully complete the drill.

Then, as it happens, within hours of training, the crew of Station 25 was off on a real call, putting to use their newly-honed skills, saving lives and property.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

See why you should be making plans to see ‘PETER PAN’, opening on November 30 ‚Äì and why many performances of the show will be soon sold out ‚Ķ

The pirate band teaches one of their own a little discipline, as this group of students block out a number from their upcoming production of “Peter Pan”.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
We are constantly amazed at high quality of productions mounted by the David Douglas High School Performing Arts Department.

This season’s blockbuster show ‚Äì a full Broadway-style production of “PETER PAN” ‚Äì looks to be a very entertaining show.

The story:
In old Edwardian London, Wendy Darling nightly fascinates her brothers by telling bedtime stories featuring swordplay, swashbuckling, and a fearsome Hook. But, these youngsters become heroes, themselves, in an even greater story.

One night, Peter Pan flies into their nursery, leading them over rooftops and through a star-filled sky to a place called Neverland. There, Wendy and her brothers are enlivened to find a land where adult rules are set aside. But, they also face confrontation with Captain Hook and his bloodthirsty pirates.

But, what happens if Peter Pan “grows up” like normal kids?

DDHS Theater Technical Stage Manager Mark Taylor Jessica Baltzor and Adara Elliott building Wendy’s house for the play “Peter Pan”, opening November 30.

A show to amaze and delight both children and adults
The sets, designed by DDHS Theater Technical Stage Manager Mark Taylor and built by the student crew, rival those found at major theatrical productions. In fact, we’re told professional theater companies have already bid to rent the sets from this show after it closes.

Add to this, the professional-quality lighting and sound, operated by the twenty-member technical crew, and you have the underpinnings of a great production.

Under the direction of Judy LeCoq, a cast of sixty – yes, 60 – actors, singers, and dancers will fill the stage, to the accompaniment of a chorus and thirty-member orchestra.

And yes, Peter Pan really flies
This classic story would certainly lose panache if Peter Pan were grounded. Have no fear – Peter Pan indeed will fly high above the stage. We have photographic evidence.

Check back in a week and you’ll see Peter Pan fly for yourself!

Don’t be disappointed, order tickets now
Opening night for “PETER PAN” at the Howard Horner Performing Arts Center is November 30 at 7:30 p.m.

Additional performances are at the following dates and times:
Friday, December 1 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, December 2 at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday Matinee, December 3 at 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, December 7 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, December 8 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, December 9 at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday Matinee, December 10 at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $7 for seniors and students, and $10 for adults.

Call the David Douglas Box Office at (503) 261-8270, Mondays through Fridays, 3 to 5 p.m. It’s also open an hour before show times ‚Äì but don’t risk being disappointed if that performance is a sellout! Order your tickets in advance.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Why was Gilbert Heights Elementary School the only grade school in Oregon to win the title of National Title I Distinguished School? Read this article and see …

Gilbert Heights Elementary School Principal Kevin Fordney says the award belongs to the entire staff of the school, because of the way they work together improving each child’s educational experience.

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
Being an educator in outer Southeast Portland is a challenging. An increasing number of their students come from less affluent – in fact, poverty-level – families. And, more of their kids are learning English as their second language.

Yet, this David Douglas School District school, Gilbert Heights Elementary, was the only school in the state this year to be awarded the title of National Title I Distinguished School.

“This is an affirmation for our staff, for the work they do every day,” Principal Kevin Fordney told us in an exclusive interview. “Indirectly, this award affirms that David Douglas schools are working hard to help a diverse group of students make good things happen.”

No overnight success
The award was six years in the making, Fordney said. It started with the expectation that children can learn; and the realization that the demographics of the area are changing.

“The school’s improvement process was started by Principal Sherrie Barger and her staff,” Fordney explained. “They took the time to stop, look at research, and determine where they were succeeding, and what they needed to strengthen.”

The school focused on making sure each child has good reading skills said the principal. “Reading is the foundation for success in every subject area of school. It also provides personal enjoyment for those who are good at it. We pour lots of effort into reading skills.”

The result: Over the last six years, staff developed, implemented, and worked together to support student achievement in key subject areas.

Beyond “teaching to the test”
Some educational advocates feel schools measured as being successful merely show kids how to “ace” achievement tests. We asked if “teaching to the test” might have been Gilbert Heights Elementary’s method for success.

Fordney pondered our query for a moment.

“That’s a good question. The answer is ‘No. We teach to the standards.’ And because we teach to the standards, students learn what they need to be learning to be well educated. Because they are well educated, they can pass the tests.”

Secret of their system
Asked if there is a secret to their success, Fordney explained, “Everyone here has agreed to ‘own’ the responsibility to help all of the kids learn, according to standard programs we’ve found to be successful. The individual classroom teacher is supported by other teachers who collaborate with them.”

On several occasions during our conversation in his office, Fordney emphasized, “This is a team honor. Every single person in the building has contributed to this award.”

Note to parents
We asked what parents can do to help their youngsters become better students.

“Reading to and with your child is important. So is being connected with your school, and your child’s progress,” Fordney responded. “We believe the success is a partnership between the student, school, and family. We appreciate parents’ help, and hope they continue to support our efforts.”

The school will receive a $5,000 award, which will be used to further assist in student achievement. The school will be honored at the National Title I Conference January 27-30 in Long Beach, California.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Learn why this event attracted hundreds to go for a run on a cold, soggy Sunday morning …

After their run, Friends of Trees volunteers Scott Fogarty, Lori Hoffman, Rachel Haig, and Steven Sonderman mulch the roots of young saplings the group has planted along the Oaks Bottom Trail.

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
More than 230 runners and walkers decided to “leaf their problems behind them” as participated in the first “Fun Run for Restoration” held by the nonprofit group, Friends of Trees.

“We wanted to have an event to draw attention to our activities,” Scott Fogarty, the group’s executive director, told us. “The run is routed though a neighborhood and natural areas where we’ve planted trees.”

Fogarty said that their volunteers are active people. “We like to get out, work, and make friends. Many of those participating in our fund-raising event today are already members.”

Event kicks off planting season
“Our planning season is starting. In addition to raising funds, and awareness, this event kicks off our ‘work’ season,” Fogarty explained. “Trees and natural areas are valued by people in the greater Portland area. People move to Portland and live here because of our trees, clean air, clean water, and green streets. We want to keep Portland green.”

The organizer said the event raised about $8,000 for their cause. Want to join in on a “tree planting party” in your area? Check their web site at www.friendsoftrees.com .

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

See how this unique event combined a soup cook-off with a dinner and auction raising $32,000 for SE Works Career Center …

Heather Ficht of Worksystems won the coveted “Golden Ladle Award” for her “Wisconsin Delight” soup; it was, presented to her by five-time previous winner Anne Sweet.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
An organization that helps people find jobs has found a tasty formula for fundraising here in Southeast Portland. They call it “Recipes for Success”.

The Sixth Annual SE Works Soup Cook-Off and Auction used its tried-and- true recipe of mixing a soup cooking contest, banquet, and charity auction to help financially support their One-Stop Career Center.

The event, held at inner SE Portland’s Melody Ballroom, attracted 225 guests, who tasted unique soups cooked by 15 volunteer “chefs”.

Two chefs were awarded for their potages. The coveted Golden Ladle went to Heather Ficht for her “Wisconsin Delight” soup that garnered the greatest number of popular votes. Kerry DeBuse, owner of acclaimed Portland restaurant Genoa, and Sunset Magazine writer Susan Hauser, bestowed the Celebrities’ Choice award on Bryan Tremayne, for his “Roasted Vegetable Soup”.

As dinner was served, the organization’s staff, board, and volunteers were honored. “SE Works strengthens our community by providing employment and education programs,” explained executive director Heidi Soderberg. “Our clients say we do more than just help people get jobs. They say we help them improve their lives, and the lives of their families,” added board chair Mitch Cogen.

Clients William Parker, Tina Velasquez, and Nakeisha Bent gave moving testimonies about how SE Works went beyond getting them a job by also helping them improve their lives.

Guests bid generously during the lively auction run by Stan Ash. The event raised $32,000 to support the mission of SE Works: Strengthening the economic health and well-being of the diverse Southeast community by increasing access to employment, educational, and support services.

To learn more about the organization, see www.seworks.org.

“Recipes for Success” photo album

Three of the fifteen “soup chefs”, sampling their creations, and hoping to win the coveted “Golden Ladle Award”. They are Patty Park of Daverci Solutions, Inc., “Cream of Wild Salmon Pumpkin Soup”; Heather Ficht of Worksystems, “Wisconsin Delight”; and Amy Parkhurst, also of Worksystems, “Autumn Pumpkin Stew”.

Celebrities’ Choice Award winner at the event was Bryan Tremayne of Pacific Foods for his “Roasted Vegetable Soup”; the award was presented by Anne Sweet.

Bob Homer and Mary Phelps, ready to bid on some of the dozens of great items at the silent auction, which ranged from weekend getaways to event tickets.

Kerry DeBuse, owner of famous Portland restaurant Genoa, and Susan Hauser, a longtime freelance writer, sample and judge each soup entry, as they prepare to bestow the Celebrities’ Choice Award to one soup chef.

Mitch Cogen, SE Works board chair, & Heidi Soderberg, executive director, start the evening’s program.

Silver Ladle Sponsor Pam Olson, of Farmers Insurance, gets ready to pop her own prize balloon, to see what she won.

Soup chefs line up to receive their Medal of Appreciation.

Auctioneer extraordinaire Stan Ash has fun with the participants, as he gets top dollar for each item.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

See why this timely event helped several folks in outer East Portland stay a bit more comfortable – while they saved money …

Anastasia Howard and Mike Masat, REACH Community Development, helped homeowners in the Lents area learn how to make their homes safer and more efficient at the workshop.

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
When the November 1 “Home Maintenance and Weatherization Workshop” took place, no one who attended would have ever guessed that pelting rain and gale-force winds would soon be on blowing through the Lents neighborhood.

To start the meeting, Anastasia Howard and Mike Masat from REACH Community Development helped homeowners in the Lents area learn how to improve home safety. They also showed how simple home improvements make a home more efficient.

Then, Thomas A Brodbeck, Multnomah County’s energy-saving guru, showed the attendees exactly how to weatherize their homes.

Folks who attended the 90-minute, seminar at Kelly Elementary School got more than just information and how-to tips. They also received basic hand tools and a fire/smoke detector with at 10-year battery.

Agencies work together providing information
Christine Rhoney, SUN Site Manager at Kelly Elementary, told us many organizations worked together to put on the workshop.

“We, in connection with ROSE Community Development, Kelly SUN Community School, Multnomah County Weatherization Program, and REACH Community Development, put together these classes to help our families have more information about home security, maintenance, and security.”

Weatherization is especially important, Rhoney told us, because many of their students’ families come from lower-income families. “The money they save in heating bills can put more food on their tables throughout the winter,” she added.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

See how an organization named ROSE helps to stabilize and improve the livability of Southeast Portland neighborhoods by helping families move into homes they’ll own ‚Ķ

Award winners were: Community Leader: Pastor Don Sieckmann, Great Day Fellowship Church; ROSE Volunteer: Board Member Virginia Petersen; Nick Sauvie, ROSE Executive Director; Business Partner: Roger Hinshaw, Bank of America; and, Community Partner: Sgt. Larry Graham SE Precinct.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
While it may seem as if Portland city government tends to focus its housing efforts on building glamorous high-rise structures, a nonprofit organization in Southeast Portland has been rebuilding downtrodden neighborhoods like those in Lents, Brentwood-Darlington, Foster-Powell, and Mount Scott-Arleta.

On Nov. 9, ROSE Community Development Corp. celebrated the agency’s 15 years of providing affordable housing to outer Southeast Portland.

As guests filtered in, the agency’s executive director, Nick Sauvie told us that ROSE stands for “Revitalize Outer Southeast Portland”.

The event was held at an unlikely time and location ‚Äì 7:30 a.m., at OMSI. But, as breakfast was served, OMSI’s large meeting room soon filled to capacity with agency partners, volunteers and donors.

Nick Sauvie, executive director of ROSE Community Development Corp.,  addressing the breakfast gathering at OMSI.

ROSE Executive Director Nick Sauvie began the program, telling the group that their mission, providing affordable housing, is difficult work.

Secrets of success
“ROSE gives families a secure place to build their lives,” Sauvie began, “and to feel that they are part of a neighborhood. We bring resources from the broader community to improve life in SE neighborhoods.”

Sauvie said The Community Development Initiative looked at programs in 23 cities. “Successful programs, like ours, have several things in common. Their plans are flexible and simple; there is a deep level of commitment from the board and staff; their plans are holistic and comprehensive; and, they work with families in the context in which they live.”

Even at that early hour of 7:30 a.m., the meeting room at OMSI was filled to capacity with ROSE supporters at their annual meeting.

Over the last 40 years — he stated, as an example of their success — the homeownership rate has decreased in Lents to about 50%. ROSE brought 40 partners ‚Äì lenders, builders, government agencies ‚Äì together to increase homeownership there.

“We hold ourselves accountable to measurable outcomes. During the two years of the Lents Homeownership Initiative, our partners have helped turn 100 families into new homeowners. Homeowners care more about their area; get involved in programs like neighborhood watch, and improve safety and livability.”

Growing ROSE
Looking to the future, Sauvie said their five-year plan includes tripling the number of homeownership units. “Working with partners, we expect to put 250 homeowners into homes in Lents; we’ll add rental units. We’ll keep helping families to succeed; working with children in neighborhood schools, particularly Kelly School.”

Portland City Commissioner Sam Adams tells why he feels a personal connection to the mission of ROSE.

Commissioner Adams testifies
After the awards were given, Portland City Commissioner Sam Adams joined the celebration. He told the group, “We can choose many things in life, but we can’t choose our families. My family had difficult times in each of Oregon’s five major recessions. Because my family had help with housing, I understand how much a ‘hand up’ can help. I’m honored to be here, among people who have done so much for so many people in East Portland.”

Adams said he was concerned with gentrification. Pointing how the MAX Green Line sparked gentrification in North Portland, he expressed concerns that the new MAX Yellow Line might price families out of the outer Southeast Portland area. “This is one reason that the work ROSE is doing is so important. Families who become established homeowners will see their property appreciate.”

You can help
Find out the many ways you can contribute to your community by getting involved with ROSE Community Development. They’re office is located at 5215 SE Duke St. Call them at (503) 788-8052 or visit them online at www.rosecdc.org.

Nick Sauvie lets staffer Sue Pupo know how much she is appreciated by him and the organization with a presentation of flowers.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Amid the blowing rain and water-filled roads, see the story of a driver who felt compelled to help a helpless motorist …

With water up to his floorboards, the unlucky driver in the blue car discovered the penalty of driving through water too deep: a dead car.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Most residents of East Portland just stayed inside when while the wind blew the rain sideways, earlier this week.

Fortunately, there were only minor reports of homes damaged by falling trees or flooding during what some called the heaviest rain in a 24-hour period in over a decade.

Low car + high water = dead vehicle
While we were out surveying East County, looking for weather-caused problems, we encountered flooded traffic lanes on Powell Boulevard. Near SE 72nd Avenue, a large SUV hit the water, hydroplaned, and ended up climbing the curb. The only real damage appeared to be the driver’s pride.

When we checked SE 92nd Avenue, about a block north of Powell Boulevard, we discovered that this particular low spot was severely flooded.

We noticed a white Toyota, sitting motionless in the southbound lane of SE 92nd Avenue. Thoughtless drivers of high-riding vehicles plowed past the disabled car, sometimes drenching it with a rooster-tail of rainwater runoff.

“I was at the top of the hill,” its driver, a damp Evan Clothier, later explained; “and I saw a Geo Metro go through the deep water just fine. But my car just ‘died’, and there I was.”

We watched a Jeep drive past the dead-in-the-water compact car slowly. It backed up, and the driver got out. A young man got out, his pants rolled up. He had a long tow strap in hand. He conferred with the driver of the waterlogged car. Within minutes, the Jeep had pulled to Toyota to safety, leaving it in a nearby parking lot.

“Good Samaritan” Larry Cusick told us he didn’t mind getting soaked when he helped pull the waterlogged car to safety.

‘Karma bank’ deposit
We asked the Jeep driver, Larry Cusick, what he was doing out on such a stormy night as was November 5th.

“The bad weather kept us in all day,” he explained, “and we were getting ‘cabin fever’. My girlfriend and I decided to go for a soft drink at the 7-11 Store.”

Why did he stop and get out of his dry Jeep to help?

“Because I figure it is good karma. Someone might stop and help me out someday, eh? They were stuck. I don’t mind. It’s just water.”

Clothier, the rescued driver, said, “What a great guy! I really appreciate this guy’s help. I don’t know him, or anything.”

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

The Oregon Clinic’s Gateway facility officially opens its doors. See why its physicians are proud to welcome patients to their new offices ‚Ķ

At the official opening of the Oregon Clinic in Gateway, Dr. Lou Libby, MD, Co-president, Chris Roemer, nuclear medicine technologist, and cardiologist Brad Evans, MD, show us their cardiac nuclear medicine camera.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
A year ago, the ground on which The Oregon Clinic’s Gateway facility now sits was a parking lot for MAX and TriMet.

November 3, staff members, managers, financiers and medical providers at the new facility celebrated its opening for patient care.

Shortly after we arrived, we became reacquainted with Dr. Lou Libby, MD, co-president, chief medical officer of The Oregon Clinic. “We are celebrating this new facility that will benefit the citizens of East Portland.”

Sixty physicians will have moved their practices into the modern brick-faced building. “Until now,” Libby said, “they’ve been crowded, elbow-to-elbow, in cramped offices in different buildings.”

Libby described The Oregon Clinic as a “one-stop clinic” for patients with complex diseases. He said they’re proud that the building is patient-friendly and environmentally sound. And, it’s right on the MAX and TriMet bus lines.

As we toured the building, we stopped in the cardiac nuclear medicine area, and met nuclear medicine technologist Chris Roemer and cardiologist Brad Evans, MD.

“This ‘camera’ is used to evaluate blood flow to the heart,” Dr. Evans told us. “With this non-invasive device, we can see if they’ve had a heart attack, if they are experiencing low blood flow, and see the pumping motion of their heart. It quickly tells us a lot.”

One-stop clinic
The new Gateway facility brings together specialty practices, including pulmonary health, critical care, sleep medicine, cardiology, thoracic and cardiovascular surgery, gastroenterology, and herpetology.

“We have rehabilitation services, such as physical therapy, on-site,” Libby informed us. “The facility also has durable medical equipment suppliers on hand who provide items such as wheelchairs and oxygen systems, in conjunction with Providence Medical Center.”

Completing the clinic are a Providence laboratory, radiology and CAT scan, and MRI and X-Ray services.

Enjoying some of the hospitality at the opening ceremony of The Oregon Clinic’s Gateway facility are Steve Maxwell and Steve Gray of Key Bank, and Dr. Kayleen Shiiba, MD.

Crossroads location important to patients
“This location is ideal for us,” Libby continued, “because Gateway is the crossroads of East Portland. When we looked at relocating many of our practices, we found this location is central to where many of our patients live‚Ķand, it is right where two major freeways intersect, right on the MAX line, and at a TriMet bus hub ‚Äì this makes it easy for patients to get here.”

A commitment to community care
Libby said the founders and managers of the clinic are committed to helping people from all walks of life.

“We’ve always been committed to caring for the Medicaid and Medicare patients. We’ve helped patients without insurance since we began operations twelve years ago. We maintain the philosophy to never exclude patients based on their ability to pay.”

Physicians, service providers, financiers, and dignitaries gather at the official opening of the new Gateway facilities of The Oregon Clinic.

As Libby prepared to welcome those who had gathered at the reception, he told us, “We want to continue to provide excellent service to the people of East Portland. We have some of the best doctors in Portland ‚Äì and now, we have one of the very best facilities in Portland. If you need good medical care, consider the physicians at The Oregon Clinic.”

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

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