Cop coverage gets stretched very thin in outer East Portland:
Read crime prevention tips … and learn how to get a booklet that will reduce your chances of being a crime victim …

Crime Prevention Coordinator Rosanne Lee gives valuable tips on home and vehicle safety to Russell Neighborhood Association members, co-chaired by Bonny McKnight.

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
More than likely, you – or someone you know – has been a victim of crime.

“You can blame it on the city, or the police department,” began East Portland Crime Prevention Coordinator Rosanne Lee, as she laid out the facts-of-safety to 21 neighbors in Russell, a northeast neighborhood on July 20. “But the fact is, you have to take some responsibility for your own safety.”

Police coverage stretched thin
“The East Precinct of the Portland Police Bureau is short-handed this year. Our police commander and staff work hard to make sure everything is covered,” Lee explained. “But, this very evening, your district [specific area of outer East Portland] almost didn’t get staffed. If there is a major situation, or multiple emergencies, your neighborhood could be without police coverage. Multnomah County has very few deputies available to help with calls.”

Steps toward safety
Lee said that forming a “Neighborhood Watch” program on your street is a good first step. “All you have to do is get your neighbors together, and we’ll train you how to set up and run your Watch program.”

When you see crime happening, or notice a fire, or know someone is in physical danger from someone else, call 9-1-1 for help, she advised. Otherwise, use the non-emergency number, (503) 823-3333.

“The 9-1-1 operators work hard to help you. Just give them the facts. As you speak, they are entering information; it goes immediately to the dispatchers.”

The more accurate and timely information you give them, Lee added, the better. If a vehicle is involved in the crime, get a good description. “Instead of just saying they left in a car, tell the operator it is a red minivan with body damage on the left side, or a loud muffler. Note the direction they went as they left the area. An officer may be able to intercept them.”

“Also, look carefully at what the person is wearing. Look for tattoos or other features like hair and shoes. They may be able to change their shirt; they probably won’t change their shoes!”

Safer parks
Attendees who live near parks asked for advice for keeping these public spaces safer. “The first step is to read and know the park rules. If you see a violation, call the non-emergency number and report it.”

Lee also urged them to consider forming a park foot patrol. “This takes a bit of training for your safety. It’s a good idea to form partner teams. Also, take a dog with you. We’re seeing a growing number of foot patrols.” Some people neighborhood associations have banded together, she added, to gain a large enough pool of volunteers for such patrols.

Car prowls
The main reason neighbors’ vehicles get broken into, Lee explained, is that people continue to leave items of value right in plain view. “Leave a ‘clean’ car. A laptop computer, even a few music CDs visible inside are enough to entice a criminal to smash in a window and grab what they can.”

Lee told the story of a street nearby plagued by car prowls. “A drug-affected young man broke into cars around his Mom’s house. One night, He cut himself on broken glass and left a trail of blood back to his home. It made him easy to catch.” While petty crooks often escape jail time, this one didn’t. “Because neighbors showed at each hearing, he eventually pleaded guilty to 24 charges and went to jail.”

Graffiti
“If you see this kind of vandalism happening, call 9-1-1,” Lee advised. After the fact, you should still report gang graffiti. “The key to controlling graffiti is persistence. If you paint it out often enough, they will go somewhere else.”

Light the night
“Darkness is the criminal’s friend”, the crime prevention expert told her audience. “Outdoor lighting makes your home – and street – much less criminal-friendly.”

Her suggestion: “While it isn’t a well-publicized program, you can get lighting installed in public places.” City officials examine crime statistics and look at the physical location, she said. “If officials agree there is a problem, and affected neighbors can come up with $350, the city will install a street light.”

Do-it-yourself home security program
“The best way to protect yourself,” Lee concluded, “is to complete a ‘Home Security Survey’, based on a document prepared by the police department. What you discover in and around your own home may surprise you.”

Lee suggested inviting a trusted friend or neighbor to help with your security survey. “Using the booklet, they may well see things you don’t.”

The booklet, “Home and Vehicle Security”, a comprehensive guide to increased safety, is available free online. You can find it at the city’s web site. The direct link is: www.portlandonline.com/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=31554 .

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

It is a simple service that drew hundreds of folks to The Grotto: Music, responsive reading and a brief talk. But, it was punctuated with barks, purrs, and the occasional screech. Read why no one seemed to mind the interruptions …

Jami Morgan comes to The Grotto’s alter with her long-haired Chihuahua, Frankie, for a blessing from Father Jack Topper.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Who’d bring their dog to church? Jami Morgan ‚Äì and hundreds of others ‚Äì did just that on July 16. And, for good reason: The event was the annual “Blessing of the Animals”.

“I really love Frankie,” Morgan told us. “He blesses me every day. I thought, today, I’d get a blessing for him.”

During the service, The Grotto’s executive director, Father Jack Topper, OSM, told those at the outdoor gathering, “Animals do something special for us; they make us a little more compassionate toward our fellow humans. ‚Ķ Treat them with love; take care of them, so they will be happy and healthy. And, we know they will take care of us. “

Is that a weasel? “No, this is my buddy Max, a ferret,” explained Tracy Johnston.

Monastery’s pets
After the service, as the pets and owners were disbursing throughout the park, Father Topper confided to us that conducting the service has been difficult for him. “I struggle getting through the ceremony’s opening because we had two dogs. One passed away two years ago, and the other went to sleep last year. They would lead the procession in. In my opening remarks, I’d say the dogs, Shiloh and Utoo, welcome their friends here for the blessing of the animals.”

Topper confessed it’s “little complicated” to have pets in a monastery. “Actually, they belonged to our order. We still have a couple of cats.”

The father said caring for pets gives him, and others in his order, a direct connection to this ceremony. “But more importantly, it reminds us of what companion animals do for us; the lessons they teach us. They bring us unconditional love, comfort, and joy. They don’t judge us. They’re always happy to see us.  Sometime I think people thank God they ‚Äì and we ‚Äì have pets. It is a blessing from God that we have these pets to take care of; and, another blessing, how they take care of us.”

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

See what happens when the local “cop shop” ‚Äì Portland Police East Precinct ‚Äì practices community policing, in the truest sense of the term ‚Ķ

Officer Seth McLaughlin, Portland Police Explosive Unit, introduces their Andros F6a Robot to Avey and Delaney Mills and Kristi Gradwahl at the East Precinct Community Fair.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Under normal circumstances, most people dislike going to the police station ‚Äì especially if they’ve just been caught in a crime and are on their way to jail. Or, they’ve been the victim of a crime, and are going for police help.

But this July 22 event was different. On this Saturday, Portland Police Bureau East Precinct was the site of a community fair, complete with food and fun.

Grilling up sizzling burgers, dogs, and chicken are East Portland Police Cadets Ryan and Craig Budey.

Some of the hundreds of citizens who came by ate lunch, while they got to know the cops who serve them every day.

Citizens took a tour of the precinct facility, learned about the continuing training programs officers receive, and got to chance to see the “inner sanctum” of the police station.

Additionally, neighbors were able to see some of tools used by police — from SERT trucks and gear, to the ANDROS: The bomb-grabbing robot.

Portland Police Bureau Cadets James Trendell, Andrea Ettlin and Kenny Bossen take a look at SERT hardware, under the watchful eye of Officer Scott Reasor.

Offering the lighter side of community police demonstrations, Portland Police Cadets Melissa Sanchez and Leanna Heasley show neighbor Vanita Pearson “The Yo” of community policing.

“The whole idea of having an open house,” explained East Precinct Commander Mike Crebs, “is so that people can come out and see the precinct, the officers, and the equipment that we use to help keep the community safe, every day. When they see us on the street, they’ll have a better understanding of what we do.”

The commander’s family joined him at the open house: They are Lesley Michael, Lauren, and Nick Crebs.

We ask if this fair is a good example of community policing. Crebs responded, “Here, we have the chance to develop a relationship with citizens. One of the things Police Chief Sizer promotes is building trust, developing relationships, as well as the feeling of being able to comfortably communicate with their police force. We’ve opened up the precinct so people can come in and see, for themselves, what we do here. This goes a long way to reduce misunderstanding and mistrust.”

If you missed it this year, do come by for the next precinct fair. You’ll learn a lot and have a good time!

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

See why even Portland’s Mayor Tom Potter took time to be part of “A block party to end all block parties” ‚Ķ

The unofficial “Mayor of Montavilla”, Errol Carlson, is credited for being the spark plug who has turned up the excitement for this neighborhood event.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
This year marks the 100th year Montavilla has been incorporated as a part of Portland. As many as a thousand folks turned out for one of the largest ‚Äì and most lively ‚Äì block parties we’ve ever seen.

From a canine judging contest and race (the Pooch-a-Palooza), to hot dogs and ice cream treats, to live entertainment on the street — this July 15 event had a little something for everyone.

Neighbors said the energy to put this event together and run it comes from corner grocery shop keeper Errol Carlson. When we asked participants why they got involved, they ‚Äì to a one ‚Äì answered, “Errol signed me up!”

The main feature of the event, centered at SE 80th and SE Taylor Court, was the Montavilla Parade. At many parades, the entrants just cruise on by. But at this event Carlson stood in the street, and spent a moment or two with every one of the parade’s entrants. Everyone got to know the participant and discover why they were in the parade.

Enjoy our photo album of the event!

Look at all the neighbors, having a great time at the Montavilla Block Party!

Keeping cool on a warm day ‚Äì while helping provide some fun for neighbors ‚Äì is Elaine Hilbert in the Dunk Tank. Why is she doing this? “Errol signed me up!” Hibert said, as she went splashing into the tank ‚Ķ again.

As the parade gets underway, everyone looks for a good vantage point.

Riding in the parade is Portland Mayor Potter, along with honored Montavilla citizen Betty Dodge.

Two newly-crowned beauty queens added their glamour to the parade.

This horse, dressed up for the classy Montavilla Street Party, was wearing his fancy duds.

80th St Review doing “All That Jazz”

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

More than just books, your Midland Library hosts many involving events every month; see why this one is just plain cute …

Midland Children’s Librarian Barbara Gorter reads a story to the lively “Sock Hop” group. A couple of the little tykes wandered up to her as Gorter read, and acted out the stories ‚Äì to the distress of their parents! “It’s OK,” Gorter said with a knowing smile to the moms and dads. “As long as they’re not hurting themselves or others, this behavior is age-appropriate.”

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
What, exactly, is a “Toddler Sock Hop”, you might ask?

It’s a fun, interactive learning session, held occasionally at Midland Library. “It is an hour of activities for our youngest patrons,” replied Children’s Librarian Barbara Gorter, “with dancing, reading stories, singing, and doing crafts.”

Another youth librarian, Sue Ciesielski, was helping Gorter during the session. “Look! We have a rousing good time. The idea is help increase literacy. Our learning activities tie in with the songs and rhymes. We make reading fun. And, this class provides the opportunity for toddlers and parents to get together and socialize.”

What are you missing out on at the library? Check out our “Community Calendar” and join in the fun!

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

UPDATE: Learn about the “Stark Street Stroll” on August 8 — See why volunteers installed new benches and planters to invite the harried to relax and enjoy the merchants and restaurants in Montavilla ‚Ķ

One of the teams installing benches and barrel planters in the revitalizing downtown Montavilla area are Maria Sworske, Sandra McDaniel, Jennifer Tamayo, Sarah Selden.

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
When Montavilla was incorporated 100 years ago, it was a bastion of civilization as one headed out ot town east of Mt. Tabor. Stark Street was one of the heavily-traveled roads which connected the city with the countryside.

But, in the past few decades, drivers went whizzing west on Stark on their way to downtown ignored the businesses that made up a once-thriving community.

One by one, the stores began to close. The movie theater shut down, and became a printing plant for a weekly shopper.

Revitalizing Montavilla
Last year, several merchants got together and formed the Montavilla/Tabor-East Business Association. Their goal is to buff up this century-old neighborhood business district.

They’re not working alone; they’ve recruited the neighborhood association to help.

On July 8, we caught up with Jennifer Tamayo, chair of the Montavilla Neighborhood Association. “Today we partnering with the Montavilla/Tabor-East Business Association. We’re installing four benches and eight whiskey barrel planters. We’re provide the man-power; they purchased all of the materials.”

Eight volunteers worked on the improvement project that morning.

“The idea is to create a better community on SE Stark St. When it looks better, and more inviting, we feel it will make people ‚Äì both shoppers and potential merchants ‚Äì stop and really consider all the potential of our area,” Tamayo said.

So, next time you’re about to head from the Mall 205 area up over the hill–drive a bit more slowly, and take a look. You’ll see these volunteers are making a visible difference.

UPDATE: “Stark Street Stroll”
The neighborhood will be alive with fun, sidewalk sales and activities on Saturday, August 5. Be sure to stop by and be part of the 100th Anniversary Celebration of Montavilla.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

UPDATE: Learn about the “Stark Street Stroll” on August 8 — See why volunteers installed new benches and planters to invite the harried to relax and enjoy the merchants and restaurants in Montavilla ‚Ķ

One of the teams installing benches and barrel planters in the revitalizing downtown Montavilla area are Maria Sworske, Sandra McDaniel, Jennifer Tamayo, Sarah Selden.

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
When Montavilla was incorporated 100 years ago, it was a bastion of civilization as one headed out ot town east of Mt. Tabor. Stark Street was one of the heavily-traveled roads which connected the city with the countryside.

But, in the past few decades, drivers went whizzing west on Stark on their way to downtown ignored the businesses that made up a once-thriving community.

One by one, the stores began to close. The movie theater shut down, and became a printing plant for a weekly shopper.

Revitalizing Montavilla
Last year, several merchants got together and formed the Montavilla/Tabor-East Business Association. Their goal is to buff up this century-old neighborhood business district.

They’re not working alone; they’ve recruited the neighborhood association to help.

On July 8, we caught up with Jennifer Tamayo, chair of the Montavilla Neighborhood Association. “Today we partnering with the Montavilla/Tabor-East Business Association. We’re installing four benches and eight whiskey barrel planters. We’re provide the man-power; they purchased all of the materials.”

Eight volunteers worked on the improvement project that morning.

“The idea is to create a better community on SE Stark St. When it looks better, and more inviting, we feel it will make people ‚Äì both shoppers and potential merchants ‚Äì stop and really consider all the potential of our area,” Tamayo said.

So, next time you’re about to head from the Mall 205 area up over the hill–drive a bit more slowly, and take a look. You’ll see these volunteers are making a visible difference.

UPDATE: “Stark Street Stroll”
The neighborhood will be alive with fun, sidewalk sales and activities on Saturday, August 5. Be sure to stop by and be part of the 100th Anniversary Celebration of Montavilla.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Read this article and learn how one business association is participating in Mayor Tom Potter’s visionPDX program; and why you should, also ‚Ķ

Jean Baker and David Ashton “pick the brains” of business people as part of the mayor’s visionPDX process, discovering the values and desires of business people in the Gateway Area

Story by Watford Reed; photos by Frank Ryan
Answers poured out, when members of the Gateway Area Business Association were asked to tell what they think of Portland, and what they’d like to see changed.

David F. Ashton, a local newsman and communications consultant, was the facilitator of this “visionPDX” session, co-hosted by Jean Baker, vice president of the Alliance of Neighborhood Business Associations and president of Division-Clinton Business Association. Because of Baker’s diligent efforts, Ashton said, businesspeople had the opportunity to participate in this city-wide program.

Ashton asked participants to keep their “druthers” short, and registered about 40 of them as he, and Jean Baker, solicited views from businesspeople in this outer East Portland community.

At the meeting, Ashton began by asking those attending what they valued most about Portland–and why. The answers ranged from the climate and the people, to diversity of geography, individuals and businesses. “People are warm and friendly,” one member said.

Others said Portland is a “clean-looking city”; it has a “small town feeling” and good schools; “if a neighborhood goes down, people work to build it up again”.

When one member said he likes the parks and green spaces in Portland, Ashton asked how many others felt that way. About three-fourths of the crowd raised hands in agreement.

Immediate changes requested
His next question sought their wishes for changes in Portland.

Cleaner rivers were mentioned first, along with lower prices for gasoline. More support for schools and more light rail and other modes of transportation followed, then training for city and county officials ‚Äì “they don’t seem to have much business experience.”

One man urged “no more taxes or fees” without approval in an election; another called for more jail space to hold lawbreakers.

Ashton then asked what Portland should “be like, if all our hopes and dreams come true, in 20 years”.

Less traffic congestion, and lower pollution of streams, were among the answers. Others said that when “government asks for a new program, revenue sources are specifically identified.” Others demanded zero-based budgets; “no fat children”, lower crime, shutting down drug trafficking, and less prostitution.

Several members agreed that sounder economic development programs should be in place.

Action steps
The climax of the session came when Ashton elicited the most important steps that needed to be taken to reach the lofty dreams put forth for the city.

Less crowding of housing, and more space between houses, were the first items mentioned. A “fairer tax system” and “election of business operators to public office instead of politicos” were urged. So was accountability for city officials.

In closing, members were invited to tell others they knew, that they can also participate in “visionPDX” by going online to www.apnba.com, and following the link to the on-line questionnaire.

On their way out, members of the business association made it clear that they were pleased their answers to these vital questions would be included in the mayor’s vision plan.

¬© 2006 ‚Äì East PDX News

Read this article and learn how one business association is participating in Mayor Tom Potter’s visionPDX program; and why you should, also ‚Ķ

Jean Baker and David Ashton “pick the brains” of business people as part of the mayor’s visionPDX process, discovering the values and desires of business people in the Gateway Area

Story by Watford Reed; photos by Frank Ryan
Answers poured out, when members of the Gateway Area Business Association were asked to tell what they think of Portland, and what they’d like to see changed.

David F. Ashton, a local newsman and communications consultant, was the facilitator of this “visionPDX” session, co-hosted by Jean Baker, vice president of the Alliance of Neighborhood Business Associations and president of Division-Clinton Business Association. Because of Baker’s diligent efforts, Ashton said, businesspeople had the opportunity to participate in this city-wide program.

Ashton asked participants to keep their “druthers” short, and registered about 40 of them as he, and Jean Baker, solicited views from businesspeople in this outer East Portland community.

At the meeting, Ashton began by asking those attending what they valued most about Portland–and why. The answers ranged from the climate and the people, to diversity of geography, individuals and businesses. “People are warm and friendly,” one member said.

Others said Portland is a “clean-looking city”; it has a “small town feeling” and good schools; “if a neighborhood goes down, people work to build it up again”.

When one member said he likes the parks and green spaces in Portland, Ashton asked how many others felt that way. About three-fourths of the crowd raised hands in agreement.

Immediate changes requested
His next question sought their wishes for changes in Portland.

Cleaner rivers were mentioned first, along with lower prices for gasoline. More support for schools and more light rail and other modes of transportation followed, then training for city and county officials ‚Äì “they don’t seem to have much business experience.”

One man urged “no more taxes or fees” without approval in an election; another called for more jail space to hold lawbreakers.

Ashton then asked what Portland should “be like, if all our hopes and dreams come true, in 20 years”.

Less traffic congestion, and lower pollution of streams, were among the answers. Others said that when “government asks for a new program, revenue sources are specifically identified.” Others demanded zero-based budgets; “no fat children”, lower crime, shutting down drug trafficking, and less prostitution.

Several members agreed that sounder economic development programs should be in place.

Action steps
The climax of the session came when Ashton elicited the most important steps that needed to be taken to reach the lofty dreams put forth for the city.

Less crowding of housing, and more space between houses, were the first items mentioned. A “fairer tax system” and “election of business operators to public office instead of politicos” were urged. So was accountability for city officials.

In closing, members were invited to tell others they knew, that they can also participate in “visionPDX” by going online to www.apnba.com, and following the link to the on-line questionnaire.

On their way out, members of the business association made it clear that they were pleased their answers to these vital questions would be included in the mayor’s vision plan.

¬© 2006 ‚Äì East PDX News

Hot enough for ya…? Pools and water features help folks stay cool when the thermometer spikes upward …

Even the temperature sign at SE 122nd Ave. on Division St. Crossing seemed to scream, “It’s TOO HOT!”

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
Looking up, the Division Station tower in the Midway Business Association district, the sign indicated 106 degrees.

So, how hot was it?  Most people with whom we spoke said, “Way too hot!”

“It’s sweltering out here,” commented Mary Jenkins, as she crossed SE Division St. at 122nd Avenue. “You can feel the heat coming up from the pavement as well as down from the sun.”

Four-year-old Chance McKiney found a way to beat the summer heat. He’s using the new “water feature” at Raymond Park, hidden away in the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood.

George Furman, noting the arrival of an unexpected cloud cover, told us, “It’s the humidity. It makes the heat seem hotter.” He was on the way to catch a bus.

A worker at Pizza Roma in Woodstock said, “The air conditioning must be working overtime. It’s pretty cool in the restaurant, but it is really hot back here by the pizza ovens.”

Being out and about, we noticed the temperature difference as we went from an air-conditioned car out into the heat ‚Äì then into an air-conditioned building. It was cool inside Rhino Digital Graphics at SE 12th Ave. and Division Street. The one-minute journey from their offices back to our car was wilting. We cooled off as we drove out to Lents, to check the heat at Quality Cage Company on SE 111th Ave., north of Foster Rd. This manufacturing company, housed in a steel building, was heating up. “We keep drinking lots of water,” said QCC’s president, Guy Cone, as he wrapped another Chinchilla Mansion for shipping. “We’ve got air conditioning at home. I can’t hardly wait.”

For us here at East PDX News, things aren’t so bad. Our office is in a daylight basement; a great air conditioner keeps it cool and delilghtful while producing and posting news stories for you!

Be of good cheer ‚Äì out “summer” is half over! Soon, we’ll be able to complain about the overcast skies and drizzle.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

See why one of the best places to hear music is
in a park this summer …

Sitting on the grass, down by the river, more than 1,000 gathered for the swinging sounds of Stolen Sweets.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
With a light, cooling breeze blowing in off the Willamette River, more than 1,000 folks came out for the opening of the concert season at Sellwood Riverfront Park on July 10.

This program featured Stolen Sweets, ’30’s swing jazz band from Portland who have just released a new CD.

Many food vendors were at the concerts. Making hot, fresh kettle corn at the concert is Caroline Barron; sampling her wares are Dan McCarthy and his son Rydan.

The smell of fresh kettle corn filled the air, vendors provided beverages and snacks. But many just brought their picnic baskets loaded with their favorite outdoor treats.

“Having a concert in your neighborhood helps all of us feel connect with our neighborhood,” explained Kristin Knapp, Summer Concerts coordinator, Portland Parks & Recreation. “Music connects people. And these concerts help us ‘claim’ our parks for ourselves and our families, and allow us to be proud of our neighborhood.”

Just one of the groups having family fun at Sellwood Riverfront Park, flanked by Sydney and Paige, is Rachel Schubert with Willis and David Schubert; friends Andy Fisher and Madison joined them for the concert.

From a practical standpoint, the music programs help improve park safety, Knapp said. “When we have events here, it helps people not feel afraid to come to the park. The park is a safe place to go. When we create good events in the park, it chases out the undesirable activities.”

The concerts, every Monday evening in July, were presented by Portland Parks and Recreation, SMILE, and several local businesses.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Looky here, pardner: This ain’t no little ole’ barn dance! See how much fun folks had when they came to the 9th Annual Barn Bash ‚Ķ

Just below, see our photo album of this great East Portland event!

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Regular readers already know about the Barn Bash put on by the Rossi family (and friends), to raise money for the Parkrose Youth Activities Fund.

If you haven’t yet gotten the word, take a look at the photos below and you’ll see why we think this is such a wonderful event.

This year’s Barn Bash attracted 1,800 folks to the most unique and fun party in Portland at Rossi Farms on July 8. When the dust settled, the Posse (sponsors and organizers) said the event raised $14,000, which will help eleven youth groups and organizations in the community.

2006 Rossi Farms BARN BASH Photo Album

Joe Rossi is ready to ice down hundreds of cold water bottles for the event.

Looks like nearly everyone in Outer East Portland is coming to the 2006 Barn Bash.

Parkrose High School ASPIRE director Teena Ainsley is one of 1,800 to pass through the Barn Bash entry gate.

Volunteers Clarence and Sharon Fode keep busy serv’n up the chicken.

The Zieglers (and friend) sit down to a plate of bodacious barbecue.

Portland Commissioner Sam Adams is served some of that delicious, tender Parkrose Lions BBQ chicken. Sam told us, “I’ve heard about the Barn Bash for years. It’s great to see this community come together to have a great time ‚Äì and support a good cause.”

The generosity of Widmer Brothers – and the thirst of the crowd – provided additional proceeds for the Parkrose Youth Activities Fund.

Multnomah County Commissioner Lonnie Roberts and his wife sit down to a great barbecue chicken dinner grilled by the Parkrose Lions Club, and served up by dozens of hard-working volunteers.

It takes a whole crew of hard-working volunteers to serve more than 1,500 freshly-made strawberry-shortcake desserts.

Folks look forward to the action of the Wild West Show and Civil War Reenactment.

As evening falls, the Barn Bash Corral fills with folks having a great time.

After dinner, hundreds take to the barn dance floor and kick up their heels into the night, to the music of “The Last Rodeo Band”.

The “clean, blue suites” provided by Craig Mendenhall’s American Sani-Cans were a big relief to Barn Bash party-goers.

Mark your calendar now!
Looking back on the 2006 Barn Bash, Joe Rossi told us, “We certainly couldn’t have this event without the dozens of volunteers who help in so many ways. Look for next year’s Barn Bash; it’s July 14, 2007.”

Foundation sponsors include the Parkrose Lions Club; Hasson Realtors, Nick Rossi PC Principal Broker; Widmer Brothers; Reser’s Fine Foods; Aldo Rossi; Tonkin Auto Group; Elmer’s Restaurants; Mid-County Memo; Oliveros & Obrien, PC; Graziano Foodservices, Inc.; William Frank Bitar & Associates ‚Äì and of course, Rossi Farms.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

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