Why are a bus-load of kids from the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood taking over the streets of the Hollywood district? Tune in to this fun article …

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Unlike many years when it has nearly been flooded out, the June 7th Portland Rose Festival Fred Meyer Junior Parade was met in 2006 by balmy spring weather. The sunshine brought out thousands of people to watch this, the largest children’s parade in the nation.

Many kids are decked out in colorful costumes as they ride floats, bikes, unicycles – and almost anything else that rolls and can be pulled along the 17-block route.

But, what really makes this a great parade are the marching musicians. This year, Ron Russell Middle School was well-represented by its Dance Team and Marching Band. The crowed enjoyed seeing these youths as they danced and played down the parade route.

Hopefully, we’ll see this great band in next year’s parade!

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Interested in Oriental medicine? Take a read and learn how the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine trains practitioners and provides services for patients …

Dr. Michael Gaeta tells community members why this school attracts students from across the nation – and world.(David F. Ashton Photo)

Special to East PDX News
By Julia Farman*
If someone asked you where OCOM is, would you know the answer? Or what OCOM stands for?  It is Oregon College of Oriental Medicine. It is world-famous and located right here in East Portland.  We recently had the privilege of learning about their program at their introductory presentation and tour in May.

Speaking about the mission and history of their 1.4 acre campus, the school’s Dr. Michael Gaeta said OCOM is the oldest of 60 Oriental medicine colleges in the United States. It is the primary destination for United States students for acupuncture and oriental medicine.

In his talk, Gaeta shared the experience of a student who visited Greece. The student sought out the only acupuncturist on the islands ‚Äì and was amazed that this practitioner was aware of the school’s outstanding reputation.  He returned to his studies very impressed, yet dismayed, that Portlanders did not seem to be familiar with OCOM.

The staff of OCOM intends become a primary change agent regarding health care in this country.  Gaeta said this kind of health care practice is centered on building relationships and thus, are patient centered.  They follow an integrated medicine approach and have applied for Regional Accreditation.

They are a member of Complimentary Alternative Medicine, as are Portland’s chiropractic and naturopathic colleges.

The school reaches out to the community, with clinics sites with InAct Inc, OutSide In, Hooper Center, Richmond Center, and soon the Emma Jones Hall at Oregon Health Sciences University, the Hollywood Senior Center and Washington County Corrections.  They are involved with the young, the old, the homeless and the imprisoned.

OCOM operates a clinic at their campus and welcome the public, with sessions being offered at reduced rates. Additionally, they hold free monthly seminars open to the public.

Interested? See them at SE Cherry Blossom Drive, near Mall 205, or call (503) 253-3443 for more information.

* “Long Term Care Extraordinaire” is how Julia Farman, CSA, is known to East Portland Chamber of Commerce members. She can be reached at Nevin, Works & Associates at (503) 274-6224

¬© 2006 East PDX News

Even though this event was aimed at helping senior citizens improve their health, you’ll be astounded to learn how anyone can keep their mind sharp ‚Ķ

Showing off her hand-painted porcelain bowl at the Senior Wellness Symposium and Art Exhibit is CherryWood resident Fedalma Ruhl. She has lived there five years.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
It was a day dedicated to health and happiness for our older citizens, May 24th at CherryWood Village.

“We’re having our 2006 Senior Wellness Symposium and Art Exhibit,” CherryWood’s wellness director, Mindy Baker, explained.  “We have two main lectures, an art show, a cooking demonstration, health screenings, and refreshments for everyone.”

Baker said the facility provides this event to the community ‚Äì as well as to their residents ‚Äì to promote senior health and wellness. And they hold it on this particular date, because it’s National Senior and Health and Fitness Day.

Sherrie Evenson, Adventist  Medical Center, tells CherryWood Village seniors how physical exercise can keep their minds sharp.

Exercise promotes mental wellness
We stopped in to listen to a lecture by Sherrie Evenson, of Adventist Medical Center.

“We’re talking about the relationship between exercise and dementia in older people.

It has become very clear to all researchers who have studied this: Exercise can slow the onset of dementia. Even more, physical exercise can slow the acceleration of dementia once you have it.”

More than cognitive functioning alone, Evenson said one’s ability to think clearly and remember things also improves. “Most people think of dementia as Alzheimer’s disease ‚Äì but that is just one type of dementia.”

One doesn’t have to spend their life in a gym working out to get the benefits of exercise, Evenson said. “Even a small amount of activity can help a lot. It seems that aerobic exercise has been the most beneficial in regard to improving cognitive skills. From ten to forty-five minutes a day is all it takes to help keep your mind sharp, and your body healthy.”

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

For a while, it looked like the shuttered Woodland Park Hospital ‚Äì its jobs and services to the community ‚Äì would be saved when local owners reopened it as Physician’s Hospital.
Learn how, and why, this facility closed …

For years, Woodland Park Hospital was the only hospital in outer East Portland. After it suddenly closed a few years ago, it later reopened as Physician’s Hospital. Now, once again, the facility has been completely shut down. Word is, it will never be a full-service hospital again.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
The sprawling hospital campus situated on two city blocks at NE 102nd Ave and Hancock St. – a fixture in the Gateway area for over four decades – is, once again, dark and silent.

How did this 202-bed, once-bustling medical center end up empty? Read on, and learn how, and why, this hospital has been shuttered.

Dedicated in 1962 as Woodland Park Hospital, the new facility was welcomed in outer East Portland as its first medical center. The new operating rooms and treatment areas gave residents access to local health care. Its emergency room treated everything from a kid’s broken arm to serious, in-flight medical emergencies–due to its proximity to Portland Airport.

Over the years, more hospitals were built in the area. Woodland Park Hospital converted a wing to become Portland’s largest medical psychiatric care center. However, the emergency room was always open, continuing to care for citizens of outer northeast Portland.

Symphony called ‘out of tune’
The hospital’s ownership changed hands five times over the years. But some say when Symphony Healthcare, located in Nashville, Tenn., bought both Woodland Park Hospital and Eastmoreland Hospital in March, 2002, these facilities started going downhill.

When the Woodland Park Hospital suddenly closed down on January 15, 2004, many of the staff members weren’t surprised. The facility’s former medical staff president, Laura Maskell MD, told us, “It is hard to take to have an outsider from Tennessee [Symphony Healthcare] take over, then ‘torch’ our hospital. Some employees have served the community here for as long as 35 years.”

Symphony Healthcare’s Ken Perry stated, “It is with great regret that we have to close the facility due to deteriorating financial conditions.” He singled out the cost of unpaid indigent care, due to changes in the Oregon Health Plan, as the primary reason.

“We’ve always had indigent care ‚Äì that’s part of being in East Portland,” Dr. Maskell rejoined. “The hospital was profitable in 2002. There was poor corporate management.”

Physicians vow to reopen hospital
A month after in closed, four area doctors — chiropractic physician Bryce Milan, orthopedic surgeon Tim Tribal, anesthesiologist physician Carlos Sobios, and neurosurgeon Jordy Kellogg — formed a group of local investors to buy the closed hospital’s Certificate of Need and facilities.

Working with Sussman Shank attorney, Barry Caplan, the doctors formed Physicians’ Hospital LLC. They brought in other partners, secured a line of credit with GE Financial, and a $500,000 deferred loan to improve the aging facility from the Portland Development Commission (PDC).

At a well-attended July, 2004 event, the PDC’s Martha Richmond, told the crowd, “Our goal is to bring more than 200 jobs back to the community.”

Almost loses license
Under the first of several administrators — Kerry O’Leary, a David Douglas High School graduate — their small staff missed their projected date, and opened the hospital on Dec. 23, days before the hospital’s Certificate of Need, a governmental charter required to operate a hospital, would have expired.

According to records obtained from the Oregon Department of Human Services, Health Services ‚Äì the licensor of hospitals ‚Äì the hospital was given provisional permission to open. The hospital was required to correct a long list of “deficiencies”, ranging from problems with the building to record-keeping procedures.

These deficiencies kept the hospital from opening most of their beds — and with few patients, the hospital lacked the money to correct some of the more expensive problems it faced.

Hospital calls 9-1-1
National negative attention was focused on the hospital in July of 2005, when a patient had complications resulting from her care after surgery.

As her situation became critical, her son, Michael W. Wilson, Pastor of Sellwood Baptist Church, and Chaplain of the Portland Police Bureau, later told a congressional committee that no doctors were in the hospital and staff members were neither equipped nor trained to handle the emergency. As a result, Wilson claims the hospital called 9-1-1 for paramedics to take his mother to Adventist Medical Center where she died without regaining consciousness.

By the time Physician’s Hospital’s last CEO too over, Bill Houston was faced with mounting problems and too little cash to fix them.

Houston, there is a problem
Late in 2005, another search of the state’s Health Care Licensure and Certification Section files revealed an additional patient care complaint. It also documented a long list of remaining “waivers” (physical plant deficiencies and policy shortcomings the hospital needed to fix to keep operating).

When we spoke with Bill Houston, the hospital’s last of the five administrators in December of 2005, he admitted the owners were trying to package a $12.75 million loan. “Instead of putting it off, we need to fix our electrical and heating-and-cooling systems, and make building repairs.”

On Feb. 14, 2006, U.S. Senators Grassley and Baucus requested that the federal Department of Health and Human Services inspect Physicians’ Hospital. Within a week, authorities suspended the hospital from serving Medicare and Medicaid patients, citing plant and operating deficiencies that put patients’ health and safety in jeopardy.

Beginning of the end
In March, 2006, Physician’s Hospital was given 90 days to fix their problems or stop operating.

The following month, Regency Hospital Co. of Alpharetta, GA, sent a letter of intent to take over the facility but later withdrew it.

“I went to pick up their license on May 25 and was given a letter stating that said they were voluntary surrendering their license and certification,” said Ron Prinslow, R.N., Manager, Oregon Department of Human Services, Health Services. “Our action stopped.”

What about the PDC’s $500,000?
“They [the current owners] are making payments on the loan; it was never in default,” Sara King, manager Gateway Regional Center URA told us recently. “It is a secured loan, meaning the loan must be paid off for the property to change hands.”

Future is unclear
A few days ago, outgoing CEO Bill Houston told us, “This is a shame. It was a battle we couldn’t win. Closing was the most ethical thing to do. It looks like the hospital has been sold to a group with have the funding it needs fix things.”

The new potential owner is Mechanicsburg, PA, based Vibra Heathcare, Houston confirmed. Founded in 2004, Vibra claims to be a specialty healthcare provider, specializing in freestanding medical rehabilitation, and long term acute care hospitals.

If Vibra does reopen the building, it appears as if will operate more as a medically-sophisticated nursing home than a full-service hospital. Outer Northeast Portland will forever lose its own emergency room; it will never have an urgent care center located at the facility.

As for Houston, he says he’s moving on to other projects, and “the new entity is bringing in their transition team. It will be an eight-month project to renovate the hospital.”

Timeline of a troubled hospital

1962
Woodland Park Hospital, 10300 NE Hancock (102nd Ave., a block north of NE Halsey St.) opens its doors, bringing a full-service hospital to outer East Portland. Portland Adventist Hospital, now two miles to the south, wasn’t built until decades later.

1962 – 2002
The hospital’s ownership changes hands several times. Woodland Park Hospital establishes a major psychiatric care center in the early 1970s.

March, 2002
Ken Perry founds a for-profit operating company, Symphony Healthcare, in Nashville, Tenn. and purchases both Woodland Park and Eastmoreland Hospitals.

June, 2003
Problems at Woodland Park Hospital are reported to Oregon Health Division.

September, 2003
Woodland Park’s psychiatric unit’s license is temporarily suspended, then restored by state regulators.

December, 2003
Horse race to the bank: Some employee’s paychecks bounce; Symphony vows to make good on them.

January 15, 2004
While the community is taken by surprise that the 200-bed hospital is suddenly closed down; employees are not.

February, 2004
Four area doctors form a group of local investors to buy the closed hospital’s Certificate of Need and facilities.

July 27, 2004
The newly renamed Physician’s Hospital holds a well-attended grand opening celebration attended by city, county and state politicians and past employees.

November, 2004
Physician’s Hospital is scheduled to open, but does not.

December 23, 2004
The hospital officially opens, days before the hospital’s Certificate of Need — a governmental charter required to operate a hospital — would have expired. It was conditional on correcting many “deficiencies” in both the building and procedures.

January, 2005
The hospital becomes Medicare-certified. It adopts the “Planetree model”, allowing for greater flexibility in patient care. Fewer than 40 of the 200 beds are opened; no more than 70 staff members work at the hospital.

July, 2005
Helen Wilson, 88, experiences complications after surgery. Her situation becomes critical – a staff member calls 9-1-1 Emergency – Wilson is transported to Adventist Medical Center. Wilson dies days later without regaining consciousness.

December, 2006
The hospital’s last administrator admits the partners are trying to put together a multi-million dollar loan to fix problems.

February 14, 2006
Authorities suspended the hospital from serving Medicare and Medicaid patients, citing plant and operating deficiencies that put patients’ health and safety in jeopardy.

March, 2006
Medicare and Medicaid suspension is lifted, provided remaining deficiencies are resolved by May 26.

April, 2006
Regency Hospital Co. of Alpharetta, GA, sends a letter of intent to take over the facility, but withdraws it early in May.

May 12, 2006
Oregon Department of Human Services, Health Services manager, Ron Prinslow, R.N., Manager, receives notification that another potential owner, Vibra Heathcare, of Mechanicsburg, PA, desires a meeting with the licensing agency.

May 26, 2006
Physician’s Hospital voluntarily surrenders its license and certification and ceases operations.

Published June 19, 2006
¬©  2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Don’t miss this great event on Saturday! See hundreds of specialty and antique vehicles; enjoy the car “Blow Up” contest; watch high-speed RC car racing; eat great food; and let the kids play in a supervised play area.
Not bad for $1 buck, eh?

Event chair Gail Bash, PBF president Gordon Boorse, and key event sponsor Rex Hollingsworth stand with the new Rose Festival Cruise-in trailer.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Six years ago, members of the Parkrose Business Association decided they needed a way to raise funds to provide scholarships for Parkrose High School seniors.

Gail Bash, the Cruise-in’s founder, gives a bouquet to Marsha Lee, the “Pit Boss” for the event. “We call Marsha the ‘pit bull’“, Bash joked.

Board member Gail Bash of Lucky Corp. came hatched the idea of holding a “cruise-in” to raise money. After some research among car clubs, Craig Mendenhall of American SaniCan proposed the late-June date.

Soon, the association’s board received Rose Festival affiliation (the only such in Portland east of 82nd Ave.). By the time their 5th Annual Rose Festival Cruise-in, held on June 24, became history, Portland Business Foundation (PBF), the non-profit arm of the business club, had raised and awarded a cumulative $17,500 in scholarships over the years.

22 Students compete for scholarship

Sarah Lange had to leave the meeting early, but not before getting her scholarship check from Marsha Lee. (Amy Salvador/PBA Photo)

Bob & Mary Brown, of Bob Brown Tires, presenting a scholarship check to Parkrose High School senior Yuliya Mikhaylov.

Alison Stoll of Central Northeast Neighbors awards a $1,000 scholarship to Angelyn Bilbrew.

Marsha Lee of Copy Express helps to further Kelli Herman’s education with an $1,000 award.

Parkrose High School seniors submit applications, and then are interviewed by members of the PBF’s committee. “With 22 great applicants,” commented Alison Stoll of Central Northeast Neighbors, “it is difficult to select only four students who will each get a $1,000 scholarship.”

PBF president, Gordon Boorse, recounts the history and promotes the upcoming June 24 Cruise-in to a packed house at the Parkrose Business Association meeting at Steamers Restaurant on June 15.

At their June meeting, PBF president, Gordon Boorse, Compaction & Recycling Equipment, told the group, “We’re certainly not the largest business association in the area. But, thanks to our many members who volunteer their time and resources, we’re able to help fund the continuing education of worthy students.”

Also at the meeting, event chair Gail Bash thanked the many sponsors and volunteers of this year’s successful Rose Festival Cruise-in. “We especially honor Rex Hollingsworth, our major event sponsor. Not only did he underwrite the event, he also donated a large trailer, as well as a new barbeque for our raffle, and also provided manpower for set-up and take-down.”

5th Annual Rose Festival Cruise-in
June 24 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

on the grounds of Parkrose High School Community Center,
12003 NE Shaver, just west of NE 122nd Avenue.

Come see the Parkrose High grassy lawn filled with
Hotrods – Classic Import Cars
Motorcycles – Special Interest Vehicles
Trucks – Low Riders
… And much more

Wait! There’s more ‚Ķ
In addition to the hundreds of cars on display, vying for trophies in over fifty categories, you’ll find food booths (including wonderful offerings from Chef Edgar of Steamers Restaurant), booths showcasing community services and PBA members’ wares and services.

The Parkrose Business Association meets the third Thursday every month at Steamers Restaurant, 8030 NE Sandy Blvd. (east of NE 82nd Ave.); NO reservations required. Info: www.parkrosebusiness.org.

¬©  2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News Click Here to read more East Portland News

See what happened when Parkrose High School students put on their first-ever outdoor performances …

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
The final performances for the Thespians of Parkrose High School offered a triple-show production the first days of June – outdoors!

Two evening shows and one afternoon performance attracted hundreds of community members, parents, and friends, who appeared to be thoroughly entertained.

Play Days of the Imagination – Just A Reminder
The Advanced Theater Class students wrote and produced this program. They shared their imaginative presentation with Prescott and Shaver Elementary schoolchildren.

Dog Lady
The Advanced Class produced and group-directed this piece, performed at the MHC One Act Festival. They also went on to present it at the State Acting Competition in Salem.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream
A unique adaptation of William Shakespeare’s play ‚Äì complete with love stories, battles against Amazons, trouble-making fairies, and so much more!

Next year, watch for the musical comedy, “Bye Bye Birdie”, the comedy farce “Arsenic & Old Lace”, and Shakespeare’s romantic drama, “Romeo & Juliet”.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

See how groups are working together to turn renters into homeowners – and why …

Mary Taylor, Bank of America, teaches prospective homeowners how to arrange their finances so they’ll qualify for a loan.

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
One way to improve a neighborhood is to turn renters into homeowners, says Amie Diffenauer, of the Lents Homeownership Initiative in the Lents neighborhood.

To this end, the organization has developed a coalition of governmental and commercial interests to increase home ownership. Banks, mortgage companies, utilities, and a church are showing families how they can start putting their lodging budget into owning a home, instead of just paying rent.

On May 20, the group put on a successful “Home Buying Fair” that introduced attendees to lenders, real estate brokers, and governmental agencies.

Good credit a key to homeownership
But, part of their ongoing effort is to provide free classes that teach people more about consumer credit, so they can obtain a favorable mortgage.

In one class we audited, Bank of America’s Mary Taylor shared the “Four Cs of Credit”.

“The first ‘C‘ is for capital,” Taylor began. “What can you bring to the deal? You need to plan for a down payment, closing fees, closing costs, escrow impounds, and moving expenses.”

The next “C” stands for capacity, she continued. “Lenders look at your current income, income history, and future earning potential. They also look at your debts — like installment accounts, revolving charge accounts, and other monthly payments.”

Moving to the third “C“, the banker stressed the importance of having good credit. “It means, in a nutshell, that you have a history of paying your bills as agreed — regularly, and on time.”

The last “C” stands for collateral. “The lender looks at what they can use to reduce their liability in case a borrower doesn’t pay. The larger a down payment the homebuyer makes, the more collateral they give the lender, making them feel more secure — and potentially reducing your loan costs and interest rates.”

Learn how to become a home buyer!
You can learn more by contacting the Lents Homeownership Initiative by calling Amie Diffenauer at (503) 788-8052 x105.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

t’s true; Jon Turino isn’t a crop farmer, he’s an insurance Farmer. Confused? You won’t be if you take a look at how he’s helping making going to college easier for a student ‚Ķ

Farmer Jon Turino ‚Äì that’s not right! Farmer’s Insurance agent Jon Turino, seen here out meeting and greeting folks at a community event, added $250 to the pot of scholarship funds provided by the Parkrose Business Foundation.

Story and photo by David F. Ashton
Some business organizations exist only to further their own agenda. Others, like the Parkrose Business Association (PBA), founded a non-profit organization, called the Parkrose Business Foundation, to help area students continue their education after high school.

The foundation grants several $1,000 scholarships each year to deserving Parkrose Area High School students to help further their college education.

The PBA’s big annual event ‚Äì the 5th Annual Parkrose Festival Cruise-in on June 24 (the ONLY official Rose Festival event east of the 82nd Avenue of Roses) ‚Äì is the group’s main fund raising activity.

And, for the second year in a row, Jon Turino, a Farmers Insurance and Financial Services Agent serving the greater NE Portland Area, has supported the program with a $250 check as part of the company’s community involvement grant program.

See our other story posted this week showing this year’s four Parkrose Scholarship winners!

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Join us at Beal St. NW on June 29 for a fund raising event featuring a full BBQ buffet, great blues music and fun …

Bob Hodges and Margaret Erikson watching an all-star band last fall at the blues music benefit at their Parkrose barbeque restaurant,Beal St. NW. This event helped NW Medical Teams raise $144,000 in donations and in-kind support for hurricane Katrina victims. Now, their friends are doing their best to help this giving couple cover major medical bills.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Folks around here love good barbecue, and enjoy great blues music know about the great tastes and sounds at Beale Street NW, 10721 NE Sandy Blvd. (just east of Parkrose Hardware).

Through hard work, Bob Hodges and Margaret Erikson took this ex-bank, ex-teen club, and turned it into a first-class BBQ joint that swings out.

But more than that, they’ve been responsible for organizing one of the most-successful-ever hurricane Katrina relief efforts, benefiting NW Medical teams.

Then, Bob became ill, and was in the hospital for weeks, undergoing major surgery. Now, it’s their friends turn to come to their aid.

Richard Kiely, Home Run Graphics, is sponsoring the East Portland Blues Benefit on behalf of Bob and Margaret. He’s showing off a Fender Stratocaster guitar they’re raffling off. Richard says, “For just $20 bucks, you, too, might be able to play like a star!”

“They don’t want to talk about it,” said benefit organizer Richard Kiley, owner of Home Run Graphics, a local, full-service printing company. “But Bob and Margaret have done so much for the community; I thought it would be good if their friends and business acquaintances did a good turn for them.”

While the benefit has been organized under the auspices of the East Portland Chamber of Commerce, other Chambers, blues music groups and members of the Parkrose Business Association are lending their support to the June 29 event.

Come and hear some great blues music, enjoy a complete barbecue buffet dinner and have a great time. We’ll be there. Will you?

East Portland Chamber of Commerce Presents
EAST PORTLAND BLUES BBQ BENEFIT
Thursday, June 29th, 2006

Beale Street NW, 10721 NE Sandy Blvd.
(just east of Parkrose Hardware)

6:00 pm to Close
(no kids after 9:00 pm please)

Raffle Prize
FENDER STRATOCASTER ELECTRIC GUITAR

Raffle tickets are $20.00 each – Limited to 100 tickets

Silent Auction prizes include
+ Gourmet Dinner for 4  +  Vacation Getaways  +  Gift Baskets  +  Golf Gear
And much, much more!

Sponsors Include
Home Run Graphics, Kevin Minkoff, CPA; Labor Ready, Stewart & Tuno Insurance and Business Builders International.

Advance Tickets
$15.00 per person
($25.00 per couple. $35.00 per family)

At the door
$20.00 per person
($35.00 per couple. $45.00 per family)
KIDS UNDER 10 are FREE

Contact the chamber office
at (503) 788-8589 to purchase advance tickets.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Read how neighbors joined with businesspeople in a unique campaign to fight crime along Portland’s Avenue of Roses ‚Ķ

82nd Avenue of Roses Association board member Mark Schmidt (far right) organizes volunteers for their crime reduction information and window-cling distribution event.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Earlier than you’d expect on a Saturday morning, a small crowd started assembling outside the Bank of the West at SE 82nd Ave. of Roses and Division St. on June 3.

Soon, two dozen neighbors, business people and other volunteers had gathered on a beautiful morning to take on an ugly issue – crime along the avenue.

People from neighborhood associations, businesspeople, and Portland Police Cadets volunteered for the event.

“This is the culmination of a collaborative effort between neighbors and businesses along the Ave of Roses,” is how 82nd Avenue of Roses Association president Ken Turner put it to us. “We started the Avenue of Roses Project, which includes planting roses as a symbol of our desire to improve our street. The idea is to celebrate the history of 82nd Avenue, and all of the good we’ve brought to East Portland. And, we’re shaping the future profile of our street.”

“The Eastside Guy” and former City Council Candidate Dave Lister, and 82nd Avenue of Roses Association president Ken Turner, present to Doug Weidman of Banner Furniture Outlet a window cling, aimed at reducing crime along the avenue.

Turner said reducing crime was the focus of this event. “We’re distributing window clings, featuring our logo, and the statement, ‘We Report All Crimes’. We’re going from business to business, asking them to display it in their windows. We’re hoping to get 150 businesses involved with us today. This is another step toward the recognition of 82nd Avenue as a good place to be, work, and give.”

Then, still early on a Saturday morning in early June, off they went, with the slogan in mind: “We’ll enhance the best, and weed out the rest.”

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

Read how neighbors joined with businesspeople in a unique campaign to fight crime along Portland’s Avenue of Roses ‚Ķ

82nd Avenue of Roses Association board member Mark Schmidt (far right) organizes volunteers for their crime reduction information and window-cling distribution event.

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
Earlier than you’d expect on a Saturday morning, a small crowd started assembling outside the Bank of the West at SE 82nd Ave. of Roses and Division St. on June 3.

Soon, two dozen neighbors, business people and other volunteers had gathered on a beautiful morning to take on an ugly issue – crime along the avenue.

People from neighborhood associations, businesspeople, and Portland Police Cadets volunteered for the event.

“This is the culmination of a collaborative effort between neighbors and businesses along the Ave of Roses,” is how 82nd Avenue of Roses Association president Ken Turner put it to us. “We started the Avenue of Roses Project, which includes planting roses as a symbol of our desire to improve our street. The idea is to celebrate the history of 82nd Avenue, and all of the good we’ve brought to East Portland. And, we’re shaping the future profile of our street.”

“The Eastside Guy” and former City Council Candidate Dave Lister, and 82nd Avenue of Roses Association president Ken Turner, present to Doug Weidman of Banner Furniture Outlet a window cling, aimed at reducing crime along the avenue.

Turner said reducing crime was the focus of this event. “We’re distributing window clings, featuring our logo, and the statement, ‘We Report All Crimes’. We’re going from business to business, asking them to display it in their windows. We’re hoping to get 150 businesses involved with us today. This is another step toward the recognition of 82nd Avenue as a good place to be, work, and give.”

Then, still early on a Saturday morning in early June, off they went, with the slogan in mind: “We’ll enhance the best, and weed out the rest.”

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

See how ‚Äì and why ‚Äì the Leach Botanical Garden’s Children’s Nature Fair “hooks” kids on learning about nature ‚Ķ

David Christenson with little Marcella and Vincent being checked in by volunteer Ann Kracke. “It is a beautiful day,” David told us. “This is our first time coming out to the Botanical Garden. It is nearby, so we thought we’d come to see the Children’s Nature Fair. They’ll see insects, bugs and animals. It is good for them to learn more about our world ‚Äì this gives them a hand-on experience.”

Story and photos by David F. Ashton
How can Mother Nature possibly compete with cable-TV and X-Box?

“We doing it by holding an annual Children’s Nature Fair,” said Katie Goodwin, spokesperson for Leach Botanical Garden.

Captivating the kids by spinning a tale about a spider is Ann Found, a professional storyteller, and Leach’s volunteer coordinator.

“We’ve been doing this for several years,” she added, “We have crafts of all kinds; making bookmarks using pressed flowers, leaf rubbings, and sun prints, and making necklaces and planting plants. We have slug races. And, our volunteer coordinator is a professional storyteller. Kids say she’s better than movies!”

Using the “rubbing” technique to make a greeting card with a dog on it is third-grader Tori Phillips, with a little help from her mom, Vickie.

150 attend this growing fair
This event has grown over the years, Goodwin remarked. More than 20 volunteers help with the crafts, and take families on tours around the garden property.

Why do this?

“Children are the future,” Goodwin extolled. “The future depends on how we take care of our environment; that which is around us. We hope we help the young generation gain an appreciation for what is here now, so they’ll maintain this garden, and the planet, in the future.”

Her hopes are already being met. While visiting the fair, we talked with parents, who, as children, attended their first Nature Fairs years ago – and are now returning to Leach Gardens with their own kids.

Leach Botanical Garden is located on SE 122nd Avenue just south of Foster Road, and is open most days.

¬© 2006 David F. Ashton ~ East PDX News

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